Mathematical Markup Language (MathML) Version 2.0 (2nd Edition)

Ron Ausbrooks, Stephen Buswell, David Carlisle, Stéphane Dalmas, Stan Devitt, Angel Diaz, Max Froumentin, Roger Hunter, Patrick Ion, Michael Kohlhase, Robert Miner, Nico Poppelier, Bruce Smith, Neil Soiffer, Robert Sutor, Stephen M. Watt

Citation
Ron Ausbrooks, Stephen Buswell, David Carlisle, Stéphane Dalmas, Stan Devitt, Angel Diaz, Max Froumentin, Roger Hunter, Patrick Ion, Michael Kohlhase, Robert Miner, Nico Poppelier, Bruce Smith, Neil Soiffer, Robert Sutor, Stephen M. Watt (Auth.), David Carlisle, Patrick Ion, Robert Miner, Nico Poppelier (Ed.), Mathematical Markup Language (MathML) Version 2.0 (2nd Edition), World Wide Web Consortium, Recommendation REC-MathML2-20031021, October 2003.
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Abstract:

This specification defines the Mathematical Markup Language, or MathML. MathML is an XML application for describing mathematical notation and capturing both its structure and content. The goal of MathML is to enable mathematics to be served, received, and processed on the World Wide Web, just as HTML has enabled this functionality for text. This specification of the markup language MathML is intended primarily for a readership consisting of those who will be developing or implementing renderers or editors using it, or software that will communicate using MathML as a protocol for input or output. It is not a User's Guide but rather a reference document. This document begins with background information on mathematical notation, the problems it poses, and the philosophy underlying the solutions MathML 2.0 proposes. MathML can be used to encode both mathematical notation and mathematical content. About thirty of the MathML tags describe abstract notational structures, while another about one hundred and fifty provide a way of unambiguously specifying the intended meaning of an expression. Additional chapters discuss how the MathML content and presentation elements interact, and how MathML renderers might be implemented and should interact with browsers. Finally, this document addresses the issue of MathML characters and their relation to fonts. While MathML is human-readable, it is anticipated that, in all but the simplest cases, authors will use equation editors, conversion programs, and other specialized software tools to generate MathML. Several versions of such MathML tools already exist, and a number of others, both freely available software and commercial products, are under development.

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