Web-Based Publishing

INFO 290-19 (CCN 42647) – Spring 2008
School of Information, UC Berkeley

Instructor: Erik Wilde

Lecture: Th 8.30–10.30, 202 South Hall

Description: Web-Based Publishing refers to making available any information that is made accessible through a Web-Based Service. Thus, Web-based publishing refers to any publishing process that is based on Web technologies, but not necessarily as a delivery technology. Web-based publishing can also use non-Web technologies as a delivery platform, for example the new proprietary Rich Internet Applications (RIA) platforms Adobe Integrated Runtime (AIR) or Microsoft Silverlight, or mobile platforms such as Android or OpenMoko. There are two main differences between information systems built around Web-based publishing, and other approaches. The first difference is that the standards used for communicating between the delivery platform and the back end are open and widely deployed technologies, which makes it easy to find and use tools, developers, and reusable components. The second difference is that because of the flexibility of the involved technologies, such a scenario is ideally suited to implement easily adaptable multi-channel publishing platforms, which can aggregate and publish information from and to a large variety of different information sources and consumers.

Date Subject Slides Resources
2008-01-24 Introduction: Web-Based Publishing refers to making available any information that is made accessible through a Web-Based Service. Thus, Web-based publishing refers to any publishing process that is based on Web technologies, but not necessarily as a delivery technology. Web-based publishing can also use non-Web technologies as a delivery platform, for example the new proprietary Rich Internet Applications (RIA) platforms Adobe Integrated Runtime (AIR) or Microsoft Silverlight, or mobile platforms such as Android or OpenMoko. There are two main differences between information systems built around Web-based publishing, and other approaches. The first difference is that the standards used for communicating between the delivery platform and the back end are open and widely deployed technologies, which makes it easy to find and use tools, developers, and reusable components. The second difference is that because of the flexibility of the involved technologies, such a scenario is ideally suited to implement easily adaptable multi-channel publishing platforms, which can aggregate and publish information from and to a large variety of different information sources and consumers. Introduction (22 Slides) XML · Web
2008-01-31 Projects: This week has a short introduction to Mantis, the issue tracking system that will be used for the course projects. Following this brief introduction, course projects will be discussed. The two projects are the Map Mapper project, which looks at ways to make map service URI interoperable across various services, and the Feed Feeds project, which is based on the idea of providing support for managing feed metadata. Both projects have back-end and front-end issues, and this course will mostly look at the front end issues. Projects (18 Slides)
2008-02-28 Atom Publishing Protocol (AtomPub): Atom is a read-only format for publishing entries and entry metadata in a feed. The Atom Publishing Protocol (AtomPub) is built on top of Atom for providing a protocol for submitting new entries to feeds. AtomPub introduces the concept of a collection, which is the set of entries which are managed through AtomPub and can be published as an Atom feed. AtomPub clients can add new entries to a collection using HTTP interactions, and AtomPub supports entries which are based on some XML format, as well as any other type of entry (such as images). AtomPub (27 Slides) Spec · Atom Landscape
2008-05-08 Project Presentations: ... Presentations (2 Slides)
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